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T SHIRT DISTRIBUTORS - T SHIRT


T Shirt Distributors - Pink T Shirt Men - Class Of 2011 T Shirt Design



T Shirt Distributors





t shirt distributors






    distributors
  • An agent who supplies goods to stores and other businesses that sell to consumers

  • (distributor) someone who markets merchandise

  • A device in a gasoline engine for passing electric current to each spark plug in turn

  • (distributor) allocator: a person with authority to allot or deal out or apportion

  • (distributor) a company that markets merchandise; "his company is a large distributor of software products"





    t shirt
  • A T-shirt (T shirt or tee) is a shirt which is pulled on over the head to cover most of a person's torso. A T-shirt is usually buttonless and collarless, with a round neck and short sleeves.

  • T Shirt is a 1976 album by Loudon Wainwright III. Unlike his earlier records, this (and the subsequent 'Final Exam') saw Wainwright adopt a full blown rock band (Slowtrain) - though there are acoustic songs on T-Shirt, including a talking blues.

  • A short-sleeved casual top, generally made of cotton, having the shape of a T when spread out flat

  • jersey: a close-fitting pullover shirt











Photo




Photo





Shark tale that changed Hollywood

By Neil Smith
BBC News entertainment reporter

This weekend
members of the the cast and crew of Jaws return to Martha's Vineyard in
the US, where the film was shot, for a festival to celebrate its 30th
anniversary.

Three decades on, Steven
Spielberg's 1975 shark drama continues to cast a long shadow over
Hollywood.
Based on the best-selling
novel by Peter Benchley, it was the movie that singlehandedly ushered
in a new era of blockbuster film-making.
It also set its then
29-year-old, fledgling director on a course to become one of the
industry's most powerful and influential figures.
Before Jaws, summer was
considered a graveyard for Hollywood studios - a time when distributors
released titles they considered sub-standard and unlikely to turn a
profit.
All that changed on 20 June
1975, when Spielberg's shark tale opened on 409 cinemas - a record at
the time - across the US.
Backed by $700,000 worth of
TV advertising, the movie swiftly became a phenomenon - spawning a
craze for Jaws T-shirts, beach towels and action figurines.
The film went on to win three
Oscars at the 1976 Academy Awards and be followed by three inferior
sequels.
Hitches

And yet it could all have
turned out very differently.
For one thing Spielberg was
initially unenthusiastic about the project, preferring to put his
energies behind a science-fiction scenario that would eventually become
Close Encounters of the Third Kind.

"I want to make
films," he told producer David Brown, who replied: "This is a big
movie. This will enable you to make all the films you want!"
Spielberg acquiesced, though
he lived to regret his decision when his movie became mired in shooting
problems, budget overruns and technical hitches.
Chief among these was the
shark itself, named Bruce after the director's lawyer. Three mechanical
creatures were built, one of which sank on the third day of shooting.
But Spielberg's insistence on
filming on the open sea rather than in a studio tank contributed to the
difficulties, resulting in more than 100 days of shooting and a final
budget three times the original estimate.
Script rewrites and casting
disagreements further delayed the project. In the words of actor
Richard Dreyfuss: "We started the film without a script, without a cast
and without a shark."
So it was with some
trepidation that Universal began previewing the film in spring 1975.
Accolade

One of the key decisions was
to ditch much of the footage involving the malfunctioning mechanical
sharks and opt for the roaming point-of-view shots for which the film
would become famous.
A decision was also made to
hold off revealing the shark itself until the final third of the movie
and to jolt the audience with additional scary moments.

The success of
these last-minute alterations became clear during the first preview in
Dallas on 26 March when a man in the front row got out of his seat, ran
down the aisle and threw up in the lobby. "That's when I knew we had a
hit," said the director.
How much of a hit soon became
clear when Jaws overtook The Godfather and The Exorcist to become the
first film to gross more than $100 million.
More than 67 million
Americans saw the film, taking its total US haul to a record-breaking
$129.5m.
The record stood for two
years until George Lucas released Star Wars.
There was a sting in the tale
for Spielberg, however. Though the film was nominated for the best
picture Oscar, the director himself was passed over in favour of
Italy's Federico Fellini.
Indeed, it would be another
18 years before the director was finally awarded that prestigious
accolade.
Was Hollywood punishing the
wunderkind for his success? Possibly - though it was a success they
were keen to emulate.
One only has to look at this
summer's roster of sequels, prequels and effects-packed spectaculars to
see that the blockbuster mentality he initiated is still very much to
the fore.

Story from
BBC NEWS:











Sheboygan




Sheboygan





SHEBOYGAN FALLS — Dale Earnhardt Jr. won't be part of the festivities when NASCAR's Nationwide Series visits Road America next weekend.
During a promotional visit to Lakeside Bottling Co. on Thursday, the sport's most popular driver, the man better known as "Junior" to his legions of fans, sounded as if he'll genuinely regret missing it.
"The drivers don't know that track very well, so it will be fun to watch," Earnhardt told a crowd of about 140 at a private Lakeside Bottling Co. event. "I hear about Road America, and it's one of the premier road courses in the country, like Mid-Ohio, an historic race track. It's great for the series to go to places like that. Hopefully the drivers can stay out of the sand."
Lakeside won a visit from Earnhardt for finishing among the country's top distributors of AMP Energy, a Pepsi drink that sponsors Earnhardt's No. 88 Chevy in the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series. Earnhardt made a brief two-hour stop at Lakeside Pepsi to meet with media, sign autographs and answer questions from fans before heading to Brooklyn, Mich., where he will compete in this weekend's Sprint Car Series race.
Earnhardt has never competed at Road America, but he has attended races there. Last summer, he watched a friend compete in a Volkswagen Jetta series. Instead of demanding a luxury suite, Earnhardt watched the race like many other RA fans do.
"I sat in the bleachers," he said.
And his wardrobe was probably similar to what he wore Thursday, a pair of jeans — Wranglers, of course — a T-shirt and a backwards baseball cap while sporting an unshaven look.
Earnhardt was a rock star who appears as comfortable meeting with NASCAR fans as he is trading paint with the Kyle Busches and Tony Stewarts of the world.
"He seems very down to earth. He seems like a local driver," said Larry Rodencal of Darboy, who attended with his wife, Patti, and brought a miniature hood to have autographed.
The son of late NASCAR legend Dale Earnhardt talked fondly of his days as a late model driver before hitting it big on the Busch Series (now Nationwide) when he won back-to-back series titles in 1998 and 1999 before moving up to the Cup series.
"Wisconsin has some great late model racing," Earnhardt said. "We talk a lot about those times even now. Some of my funnest times were racing in the late models. You had the camaraderie and fellowship, the same group of guys who race every week."
Even though he grew up in the shadow of his father, it took Earnhardt a while to adjust to the everyday rigors of being a NASCAR driver.
"There are more things to do besides drive the car, play video games, and eat pizza," he joked.
One of those things are events like Thursday's, meeting and greeting the sponsors and fans that have made him the rarest of NASCAR drivers, a star who is as comfortable talking with "Rolling Stone" magazine or filming an episode of MTV's "Cribs."
"I'm enjoying what I do for NASCAR, and I enjoy what NASCAR has done for me," Earnhardt said. "But I'm only half-satisfied, my glass is only half full. I have more to do. I'm 35 years old, and I'd like to race seriously for at least another 10 to 15 years. I've got a lot of time to make things happen."










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